Thanksgiving Table Décor Ideas

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“Gratitute unlocks the fullness of life.”  Melody Beattie

Thanksgiving tables are fun to set with all the rich colors of fall and the theme of abundance.  Every year my tables vary with how many people I am hosting.  In this post, I’ll share several ideas for setting your holiday table.

This year I’ve played around with white and gold as a color theme, simply elegant.  Off-white woven placemats were set on a bare table with an off-white and gold runner, repurposed from Christmas.  A beautiful pashmina scarf or a length of fabric you love can stand in as a runner.  I came up with 2 variations of this basic table setting.  In both, I tied a gold organza ribbon around off-white napkins embroidered with gold Fleur-de-Lys.  The Fleur-de-Lys are a nod to my family’s French ancestry.  I added a gold leaf ornaments with a tiny gold acorn on each.  The ornaments can be given to the guests as a favor.   A gold charger was layered with a white dinner plate and topped with a glass amber salad plate.  Amber glassware adds another layer of gold.

In the second version, the plates are left bare.

One centerpiece is a modern, non perishable vignette, which can be set out well in advance of the big day.  In a small gold and white ceramic vase, I placed a sheaf of wheat and surrounded it with some small gilded berries and moss.  I set the vase on a mirrored tray and elevated it on top of a beaded gratitude journal.  A brass spiky sphere adds more gold color and interest.  The gold and mother-of-pearl opera glasses are a nod to the German ancentry in our family, having belonged to a great-great grandmother on my husband’s side.  The flatware is my Godmother’s silver.  I really loved weaving family history in this table setting.  Think of your own family history and compose a meaningful centerpiece reflecting your ancestry.

The centerpiece is flanked by 2 gold hurricanes with bead detailing and several white votive candles. I quite liked this simple centerpiece.

The other version featured a more traditional arrangement with fall flowers in a white soup tureen. I created it with supermarket flowers, some dried seed pods, flowers and foliage from the garden,  as well as feather clusters.

In this version, I left the guilded pears on the amber salad plates.

In this version, I removed the gilded pears from the plates and tucked them into the centerpiece.

The white and gold theme is an easy canvas to decorate around.  My favorite was the one with the modern wheat arrangement and the unadorned salad plates.

From the archives, I’ve compiled inspiring Thanksgiving/fall table ideas from years past.  Click on the highlighted title to be taken to the post to read more about each table setting.

Thanksgiving Table with Golds and Reds

Thanksgiving Table of Abundance

Alfresco Fall Table

Candlelight Apple Centerpiece

You can read a step by step tutorial on creating a Thanksgiving flower centerpiece here.

If you’d like to try your hand at designing a Beidermeier-style centerpiece on a cake platter with fall flowers, visit this post.  They are so much fun to do and get a lot of oohs and aahs!

I hope I’ve inspired you to create a lovely Thanksgiving table of your own.  Wishing you a wonderful Thanksgiving.

           “Not what we say about our blessings, but how we use them, is the true  measure of our Thanksgiving.”

W. T. Purkiser

Fall Alfresco Table Setting

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“By all these lovely tokens September days are here,

With summer’s best of weather

And autumn’s best of cheer.”

Helen Hunt Jackson

When summer’s sultry heat has abated and the leaves have just started to turn is a wonderful time to enjoy some fall alfresco dining.  Take a cue from nature and highlight autumn’s gorgeous jewel shades in your table setting.  Start dinner a bit earlier to catch the setting sun and share some easy conversation around a table set under the early autumn sky.  Bring in some candlelight and break out the sweaters to stretch the evening under the stars.

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Fall Floral Centerpieces from the Garden

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“Flowers always make people better, happier, and more helpful; they are sunshine, food and medicine to the mind.” Luther Burbank

One of my favorite challenges is to create floral arrangements out of what is blooming in my garden, no matter the season.  Come fall, the selections are fewer but no less interesting.  I was hosting a large group recently and needed several floral arrangements to place throughout the house. I went foraging in my garden and this is what I was able to find to work with:

  • persicaria ‘Red Dragon’, for its pretty purple and green foliage
  • hydrangea, in various stages of colors from green to deep pinks
  • astilbe in its post flowering seed stage
  • a few yellow annual dahlias still blooming in a planter
  • hardy begonias both for their delicate pink flowers and for their striking heart-shaped leaves
  • sedum ‘Autumn Joy’, still in its green stage
  • a single ‘Pierre-Auguste Renoir’ rose

I will show you half a dozen way I used different combinations of these flowers to create beautiful arrangements, all a bit different from one another.  Even when I didn’t think I had very much to work with and I was ready to run out to buy flowers, I managed to create seasonal centerpieces and hope to give you ideas to do the same.

For the bar area I created a tall arrangement in a birch bark container using astilbe, sedum, hydrangea, upside down begonia leaves and feather clusters in autumnal colors.  I started with a tight bundle of astilbe. I then wrapped sedum around their stems. Next came a crown of hydrangeas just beneath the sedum. I finished the arrangement with upside down begonia leaves for their striking pink color. I just gathered the flowers in hand and tied the stems together with an elastic band to keep the arrangement tight. I stuck the feathers in last. This is my favorite creation by far.  Doesn’t  it look like it came from a high end florist? Continue reading

How to Throw a Summer Crab Boil Party

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“The best way to eat crabs, as everyone knows, is off newspaper at a large table with a large number of people.” Laurie Colwin

A crab boil is one of the easiest summer entertaining parties to host.    Low on stress and high on fun, I make mine even easier by ordering the crabs already cooked, encrusted in Old-Bay style seasoning and picked up piping hot, right before guests arrive. Where we live these red-shelled beauties are Maryland blue crabs from the Chesapeake.  Their Latin name, Callinectes sapidus, means beautiful swimmer. Their flesh is sweet and succulent and they are in season now.  Aren’t they gorgeous? Continue reading

Easter Table and Front Porch Décor

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Treating you to lots of eye candy today to inspire your spring or Easter décor and entertaining!  From the welcome of spring blooms on our front porch to Easter around the house and at the table, there are ideas galore  to take away.  Enjoy!

An ice cream parlor chair repurposed into a planter greets visitors with a chalkboard welcome sign. Tutorial here.

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Christmas Brunch Among the Wrappings

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“Man cannot live on presents alone.” NYTimes

I love that quote!  After the last present has been opened, your loved ones will be famished.  Many of these brunch recipes can be made ahead, leaving you to savor the magic of the season too.  From sweet to savory, all of these recipes are delicious and sure to please your peeps as you break the fast together on Christmas morn.

Cranberry Orange Scones

Festive with a wonderful orange glaze.

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Candy Cane Poinsettia Centerpiece-DIY

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Did you know December 12th is National Poinsettia Day in the US?  To celebrate, I’ve got a tutorial for creating a fun candy cane covered vase for a small poinsettia.  The poinsettia is a member of the spurge family and is indigenous to Mexico.  Its English name originated from the first US minister to Mexico, Joel Roberts Poinsett, who introduced the plant to the US in 1825.  In Mexico the plant is called Flor de Noche Buena or Christmas Eve Flower, which is such a pretty name.  The Aztecs used the plant to produce red dye and as an anti pyretic.  Today, the plant is mostly ornamental and beloved around the world.  Did you know that the flowers of the poinsettia are really small and grouped in the yellowish center of the colored bracts?  That’s right.  The bright red “flowers” of the classic poinsettia are actually its leaves.  The bracts can also be pink, cream, orange, pale green or marbled.  Now let’s get to this fun project!

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